Ancira Nissan Compares 2017 Nissan Rogue Sport VS 2017 Honda HR-V Near Boerne, TX

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2017 Nissan Rogue Sport

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VS

2017 Honda HR-V

Safety Comparison

The Rogue Sport SL offers optional Forward Emergency Braking, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The HR-V doesn't offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Rogue Sport SL’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The HR-V doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Rogue Sport (except S) offers an optional Around View® Monitor to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The HR-V only offers a rear monitor.

To help make backing safer, the Rogue Sport SV/SL’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The HR-V doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Rogue Sport SL has standard NissanConnect, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The HR-V doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Rogue Sport and the HR-V have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive and blind spot warning systems.

Reliability Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2016 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Nissan vehicles are better in initial quality than Honda vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Nissan 10th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 18 more problems per 100 vehicles, Honda is ranked 23rd, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

The Rogue Sport’s 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 20 lbs.-ft. more torque (147 vs. 127) than the HR-V’s 1.8 SOHC 4 cyl.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

The Rogue Sport has 1.3 gallons more fuel capacity than the HR-V (14.5 vs. 13.2 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Rogue Sport’s brake rotors are larger than those on the HR-V:

 

Rogue Sport

HR-V

Front Rotors

11.7 inches

11.5 inches

Rear Rotors

11.5 inches

11.1 inches

The Rogue Sport’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the HR-V are solid, not vented.

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Rogue Sport SL’s tires are larger than the largest tires available on the HR-V (225/45R19 vs. 215/55R17).

The Rogue Sport SL’s tires provide better handling because they have a lower 45 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the HR-V’s 55 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Rogue Sport SL has standard 19-inch wheels. The HR-V’s largest wheels are only 17-inches.

The Rogue Sport has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The HR-V doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

For superior ride and handling, the Nissan Rogue Sport has fully independent front and rear suspensions. An independent suspension allows the wheels to follow the road at the best angle for gripping the pavement, without compromising ride comfort. The Honda HR-V has a rear torsion beam axle, with a semi-independent rear suspension.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Rogue Sport’s wheelbase is 1.4 inches longer than on the HR-V (104.2 inches vs. 102.8 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Rogue Sport is 2 inches wider in the front and 1.6 inches wider in the rear than on the HR-V.

For greater off-road capability the Rogue Sport has a greater minimum ground clearance than the HR-V (7.4 vs. 6.7 inches), allowing the Rogue Sport to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged.

Chassis Comparison

To almost totally eliminate engine vibration in the passenger area, the Rogue Sport has a liquid-filled front engine mount. The liquid helps further dampen engine harshness. The HR-V uses conventional solid rubber engine mounts.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Rogue Sport has .1 inches more front headroom, 1.6 inches more front legroom, .3 inches more front hip room and 1.2 inches more rear shoulder room than the HR-V.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Rogue Sport has a larger cargo area with its rear seat folded than the HR-V with its rear seat folded (61.1 vs. 58.8 cubic feet).

Ergonomics Comparison

The Rogue Sport (except S) offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The HR-V doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The Rogue Sport’s speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The HR-V LX/EX’s standard fixed intermittent wipers only have one fixed delay setting, so the driver will have to manually switch them between slow and intermittent. The HR-V EX-L’s manually variable intermittent wipers don’t change delay with speed.

While driving with high beams on, sensitive light sensors available for the Rogue Sport SL detect other vehicles which could be blinded and automatically switch to low beams. The HR-V doesn’t offer automatic dimming high beams.

On extremely cold Winter days, the Rogue Sport’s optional (except S) heated steering wheel provides comfort, allowing the driver to steer safely and comfortably before the vehicle heater warms up. The HR-V doesn’t offer a heated steering wheel.

The Rogue Sport has a standard center folding armrest for the rear passengers. A center armrest helps make rear passengers more comfortable. The HR-V doesn’t offer a rear seat center armrest.

The Rogue Sport SV/SL’s standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. The HR-V doesn’t offer dual zone air conditioning.

Both the Rogue Sport and the HR-V offer rear vents. For greater rear passenger comfort, the Rogue Sport has standard rear air conditioning vents to keep rear occupants cool in summer or warm in winter. The HR-V doesn’t offer rear air conditioning vents, only heat vents.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the Rogue Sport SL offers an optional Intelligent Cruise Control, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The HR-V doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

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